Fun Things to Do in Boston in the Winter

go boston

Though it may be a bit chilly, winter is a wonderful time to visit the historic and quaint city of Boston. You can embrace the joy of the season with these fun things to do in Boston in the winter. Not a fan of the cold? That’s okay! Many of these activities are indoors, so you can stay toasty and warm even when the weather outside is frightful. So let it snow!

 

  1. Climb the Bunker Hill Monument

    Get the best of history and scenery when you climb this 221-foot tall monument built in 1842 and located right on the site of the first major battle of the Revolutionary War. You’re bound to keep warm as you climb the 294 steps to the top, where you’ll be rewarded with a panoramic view overlooking the city and the harbor. Best of all, admission to the Bunker Hill Monument is free year round.

     

  2. Tour the Samuel Adams Brewery

    While in Boston, you’ll surely hear all about Samuel Adams, one of our nation’s Founding Fathers. Although apparently tea wasn’t his thing, he did have quite the affinity for brewing beer. And thus, Samuel Adams Brewery was founded (nearly 200 years later), putting American craft brewing on the map. On this tour you’ll experience the entire process of brewing from start to finish and taste the special malts used to brew Sam Adams. Plus, with your Go Boston Card, you’ll receive your choice of Sam Adams glassware entirely free!

     

  3. Ice Skate on the Frog Pond

    If you can brace the cold to experience one of the most delightful and popular winter activities in Boston, head to the Boston Common to ice skate on the Frog Pond. Whether you’re traveling with kids or on a romantic getaway, the Frog Pong is the perfect spot to have a little winter fun. Adult admission is only $5 and kids’ admission is free. If you don’t have a pair of skates, you can always rent a pair right at the rink. Don’t want to skate? The rink is a great place for people-watching as well!

     

  4. Eat an Authentic Yankee Dinner at Durgin-Park

    Exploring the city in the winter, you’ll probably work up quite an appetite. For a truly Boston-style dinner, head to the famed Durgin-Park for a meal that’ll satisfy even the biggest appetites. Durgin-Park is one of the oldest continuously running establishments in the country and has specialized in serving delicious New England comfort food to the local characters and market men for 180 years. So dig in to some famous Boston Baked Beans, traditional Clam Chowder, or signature Prime Rib Steak.

     

  5. Warm up with Hot Chocolate Burdick in Harvard Square

    Sip some of the best hot chocolate you’ve ever tasted in one of the liveliest areas in Boston. Burdick cafe and chocolate shop is a favorite among locals young and old. Their melt-in-your-mouth hot chocolate comes in every flavor, including six specialty varietes made with cocoa from around the globe!

     

  6. Step Back in Time at Paul Revere’s House

    It may be a bit too cold for a full tour of the Freedom Trail, but that doesn’t mean you can’t see some of its premier attractions! On April 18, 1775, Paul Revere left his home in the North End to take the “Midnight Ride” that would lead us to remember him as an American legend and hero. His home, the oldest standing structure in downtown Boston, is one of the few remaining structures from the Colonial era. You’ll have the opportunity to walk around inside the Paul Revere House as you learn more about the man who played an important role in the
    beginning of the American Revolution.

     

  7. See The Nutcracker

    What’s the holiday season without a viewing of The Nutcracker? The Boston Ballet’s version of the beautiful ballet is an unforgettable holiday event for the whole family! This enchanted world of palaces and sugar plum fairies is like a dream you don’t want to wake up from. Boston Ballet’s The Nutcracker is only running through December 31st, so buy your tickets while you can!

Comments

  1. limo boston says:

    this is great and very helpful article thank you. I’ll keep this as an “instruction guide”

Please leave a comment!

*


*